VAWA Immigration Lawyer

Law Offices Of Leonelba MartinezImmigration Law Offices of Leonelba Martinez, PLLC
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Leonelba

VAWA Attorney

The Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) petition is an immigration benefit that protects immigrants from domestic violence. VAWA petitions permit battered immigrants to apply for legal status in the United States without relying on their abusive spouse, parents, or children to sponsor their Adjustment of Status (Form I-485) applications.

In addition to helping victims file a petition under VAWA, VAWA attorneys help abuse victims protect themselves from further harm.

Requirements For Protection Under VAWA

In terms of VAWA, a green card may be available to you if you’ve been the victim of battery or extreme cruelty committed by a US citizen or lawful permanent resident:

  • Spouse or former spouse

  • Parent

  • Son or daughter

An experienced VAWA immigration attorney such as Leonelba Martinez will be able to help you determine your eligibility for a VAWA petition. Contact the Law Offices of Leonelba Martinez to schedule a consultation.

What Does a VAWA Immigration Lawyer Do?

A highly experienced immigration lawyer helps with VAWA applications by providing conventional legal advice on your rights. They help immigrants who are victims of domestic violence or any other type of abuse in a relationship.

VAWA immigration lawyers help their clients to gather and present necessary evidence on time. The evidence is meant to prove immigrant victims’ abuse and extreme cruelty.

 

Overview of How VAWA Works

 

VAWA offers three types of immigration relief:

 

VAWA Self Petition

Victims of domestic violence, child abuse, and elder abuse can apply for permanent residency without the cooperation of their abusers under the Violence Against Women Act.

Battered Immigrant Women Protection Act

Besides VAWA, the Battered Immigrant Women Protection Act provides relief to noncitizen victims of violent crimes as well as victims of sexual assault and human trafficking.

Nonimmigrant status U (U visa) is reserved for victims of certain crimes who suffered substantial physical or mental abuse and were helpful to government or law enforcement officials in investigating or prosecuting crimes. Similarly, T visas provide immigration relief to victims of human trafficking and sex trafficking.

 

VAWA Cancellation

If you are already undergoing removal proceedings, VAWA Cancellation of Removal relief may result in legal permanent status and eventually a green card if you meet the requirements.

To learn more about the eligibility requirements for each of these protection-based pathways, contact the Law Offices of Leonelba Martinez.

VAWA Petition Services in Boynton Beach

The Law Offices of Lenelba Martines has vast experience offering immigration services and may be able to help you with your VAWA petition and cancellation proceedings. From start to finish, we guide you through the entire VAWA process and advocate for your rights. Call us today to schedule an appointment.

 

Frequently Asked Questions

 

Can VAWA Applications Get Rejected?

Certain circumstances lead to the denial of VAWA applications, including:

  • Lack of documentary evidence
  • Inability to prove that you lived with the abuser
  • Lack of good moral character, e.g. a criminal record

 

What Is the VAWA Filing Process?

To apply for a VAWA green card, you must complete Form I-360 and submit it to the US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), together with the required supporting documents, including:

  • Evidence of abuse, such as court protective orders and police records
  • Evidence that the abuser is a US citizen or green card holder
  • Proof that the abuser is your spouse, parent, or child, such as a marriage certificate or birth certificate
  • Proof that you currently reside in the US and that you lived with the abuser